Upcoming Events For Literary Folk

By Betsy Mikel in Arts & Entertainment on May 5, 2010 3:20PM

2010_05NiceBeach.jpg
How to Wreck a Nice Beach by Dave Tompkins.
Tonight: Graphic novel artists Chris Ware, Anders Nilsen, Ivan Brunetti, and Jeffrey Brown are discussing the impact of graphic novels on the literacy world for an event titled "Partnership of the Picture and the Word."
Northwestern's Block Museum of Art, 40 Arts Circle Dr, 6 p.m., free

Tonight: The Encyclopedia Show brings together writers, musicians, artists, and improvers and poets who perform something related to the month's topic. This month, thirteen guest performers and the cast regulars have something to say about..... Wyoming.
Vittum Theatre, 1012 N Noble, 7:30 p.m., $6

Thursday: Local magazine publisher Stop Smiling is releasing its first book, How to Wreck a Nice Beach in which author Dave Tompkins explores the history of the vocoder.
Slideshow and Discussion, Stop Smiling Storefront, 1371 N. Milwaukee Ave., 7 p.m., free
Book Release After Party, The Charleston, 2076 N Hoyne, 9 p.m, free

Thursday: Blank Line Collective and Chicago Underground Library are partnering to present Lacey Prpic Hedtke's zine Likes/Dislikes as a performance piece. The zine examines how humans relate to other people based on common likes and dislike. This event is part of CUL's literary-flavored performance "Orphan Works" series.
Fulton Street Collective, 2000 W Fulton, 2nd Floor, 7:30 p.m., free

Friday: Anita Lobel, who is an author and illustrator of children's literature, presents this year's Zena Sutherland lecture. Lobel's books include Caldecott Honor book On Market Street and National Book Award Finalist No Pretty Pictures: A Child of War.
Harold Washington Library Center, 400 S State, 7:30 p.m., free, RSVP required online or by calling 312.747.4780

Saturday: The first installment of Open Books' Spotlight on Literacy focuses on the effects of the economic depression. During the session, participants will watch movie Waging a Living and discuss the book The Working Poor: Invisible in America. The series aims to dig deep into issues that affect literary.
Open Books, 213 W. Institute Pl, 3 p.m., free